The Books of 2016: Non-Fiction

Welp, due to the usual causes of laziness and poor follow-up, I’m waaaay behind on reviewing the books I read in 2016. So, we’ll just do a Greatest Hits type thing this week to wrap that up before I fall behind on 2017 as well. Which I will. Because I suck.

Anywho. These are the best non-fiction books I read this year.



The Chaos of Empire: The British Raj and the Conquest of India
 
by John Wilson

Wilson’s case here is simply that the entire British experience in India was an orgy of unplanned violence and accidental conquest that cared solely about perpetuating itself. So, a revisionist take for sure, but a much-needed one, even if Wilson often commits the authorial foul of ascribing the worst possible motives to English agency at all times while excusing/diminishing those of the Indians themselves.

I’m not sure that Wilson makes his case entirely, but it’s enjoyable regardless to wade through the reams of evidence he piles up to make his point that the entire British legacy in India amounts to little more than a bureaucratic predilection towards writing things down and never referring to them again, alongside an almost incalculable pile of bloodshed and death via, if not outright violence and racism, then criminal administrative indifference to the fate of the governed.

Taking or leaving agreement with the author’s thesis, the book works well as a single-volume history of Britain and the subcontinent, a solid achievement in and of itself as such volumes aren’t exactly in abundance.


The Fall of Paris: The Siege and The Commune 1870-71 by Alistair Horne

Even the French admit that Horne, an Englishman, is one of the best historians of France ever to exist. I love every book of his that I’ve read (his Seven Ages of Paris will forever remain one of the most enjoyable works of history I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading through), and figured it was high time to start in on the trilogy that he made his name with back in the 60’s.

The Fall of Paris is the first of three books dealing with pivotal events in the history of modern Paris (and, through its crown jewel of a city, France in general), the other two being about the Battle of Sedan in 1916 and the German invasion and defeat of France in 1940, both of which are on my docket to read this year.

This is a long book, because a fucking LOT happened in those two years. And Horne can almost make you feel like you were there, from the initial expectations of victory over the hated Prussians, through the agony of the following defeat, and then the increasingly bloody chaos of the Commune and the Republic’s savage reaction afterwards.

This is not a topic well-covered or even known much about by many Americans, but it’s one of the more-fascinating stories in Western history and this book is a fantastic way to learn about it. Horne loads the book with personal details about the events and all of personas dramatis that have roles in them; it’s a hell of a narrative as well as a history.


So, there ya go. Two great non-fiction reads I enjoyed immensely in 2016. There were others (Paper, by Mark Kurlansky, was oddly engaging for a book about, well… paper, so consider this an Honorable Mention), but these two, when I look back, are the ones that stood out most.

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